Summer 2016 News: Congratulations to GAGD’s 2016 Fellows, Masters, and LLSRs

 

Fellows

Fellowship is awarded to distinguished members who have demonstrated their professional commitment by completing 500 hours of continuing education.

Not Pictured Farid Hamidzadeh, DMD

William T. McFatter, DDS, MAGD

William T. McFatter, DDS, MAGD

William W. Clance, DMD, MAGD

William W. Clance, DMD, MAGD

Masters

The Mastership Award is one of the AGD’s highest honors and one of the most respected designations within the profession. To earn this award, recipients completed 1100 hours of continuing dental education.

 

Magdy M. Attia, DMD, MAGD

Magdy M. Attia, DMD, MAGD

M.E. Jones-Harry, DMD, MAGD

M.E. Jones-Harry, DMD, MAGD

LLSR Winners

The AGD awards Lifelong Learning and Service Recognition (LLSR) to members who have demonstrated a commitment to pursuing continuing education, volunteering their services to communities in need, mentoring associates and new dentists, and participating in organized dentistry. To receive this recognition, Drs. Attia and Jones-Harry each completed 1,600 hours of CE and performed at least 100 hours of dental-related community or volunteer service.

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Summer 2016 News: #Winning

The GAGD Explorer Won First Place in AGD’s Constituent Award Category For Excellence in Newsletter Publishing. GAGD President-Elect Ken Gilbert, DDS, FAGD officially accepted the ACE Award for Communications during the 2016 House of Delegates meeting in Boston on July 14.

GA dentist newsletter

Georgia AGD Newsletter Award

Interested in contributing to GAGD’s award-winning newsletter?
If you have an idea for an upcoming Explorer edition (i.e. articles, Member Spotlight suggestions, honors, awards, testimonials, or other news of interest) please send your submission to sally@gagd.org. Rough drafts always welcome!

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Summer 2016 News: MasterTrack: Be the Engineer of Your Career

MasterTrack V Endodontics with Dr. Alex Fleury

MasterTrack V
Endodontics with
Dr. Alex Fleury

The MasterTrack education continuum meets regularly over a five-year period and includes coursework in periodontics, occlusion, cosmetics, endodontics, oral surgery, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, oral pathology, fixed prosthodontics, operative dentistry, removable prosthodontics and implants.

The next class starts in 2019. Contact the GAGD Executive Office for more information, by phone (404) 299-7987 or email Kathryn@gagd.org.

mt5_fleury0807162

 

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Summer 2016 News: Facial Injectables and The Ideal Esthetic Consultation By GiGi Meinecke, DDS

Creating a top-notch consultation that fully informs both parties is essential to treatment success.

If you’re like most practitioners, you probably consider patient consultation visits but financially unrewarding. Yet this aspect of the treatment process is highly valued by the patient, and is a perfect opportunity to deliver a quality experience that demonstrates your expertise, inspires patient confidence, and creates a loyal and happy patient who will refer others to your practice (and increase your bottom line!)cosmetic dentistry

This article breaks down the esthetic consultation step by step, explains what to emphasize, and how best to use this time to your advantage.

Consultation Format
Like other standardized treatments, each consultation visit should be careful, thoughtful and uniform. Even if the consult is with a dental patient of record, you and your staff still need to prove yourselves in the world of facial injectables. Here are some points to consider:

  • Both practitioner and patient should leave the consultation feeling fully informed—this sets the stage for a positive patient outcome.
  • Following a blueprint for the esthetic consultation allows you and your staff to work in concert, where all the players:  your front desk, your assistant and you, know what’s expected of them. Not having a structured, quality, repeatable experience for all your potential facial injectable patients is both a missed opportunity and may expose you to unnecessary risk.

Let’s turn, now, to the anatomy of the esthetic consult.  We’ll dissect each element and explore the step-by-step approach.

The Esthetic Consult

Step 1: Paperwork

Have the appropriate medical history and esthetic consultation forms available to download on your website, or have the appointment coordinator email them to the patient before the appointment—procedural readiness is always reassuring.   Review the completed forms before seeing the patient.  Demonstrating knowledge about a patient’s medical history during the consultation inspires patient confidence.

Step 2: Diagnostic Photographs

Invest in training your staff how to take quality clinical photos, including: frontal, lateral, and oblique poses in animation and repose.

Step 3: Chief Complaint

Here are the main points to consider.

  • What are the patient’s perceived defects?
  • What do you think are the perceived defects?
  • Are the defects amenable to injectable treatments?
  • Can you agree on a treatment plan?
  • Is this a patient you want to treat?

The patient is focusing on related, but different, areas: What is the cost? Will it be painful? How much recovery time will I need? Are there potential complications? Will I look overdone?

Here are some questions that I find to be helpful when beginning a consultation:

  • What brings you in today?
  • What are the top 3 things that bother you about your face?
  • If money was no object and anything was possible, what would you correct?

You might observe areas that would lend themselves to treatment but they don’t fall within the patient’s immediate esthetic concerns (i.e. the chief complaint).  Unless these areas are related, meaning, they are the etiology of the patients concerns, they’re best left alone at the initial consultation. Upselling in the facial injectable market is ill-advised—both from a patient satisfaction point of view as well as being a legal liability.
Step 4: Photographic Evaluation and Patient Education

Now it is time to look together at the patient’s photos. Why use photos instead of a mirror? Not only does a mirror display a view that is backwards and one-dimensional (lateral and oblique views are invisible) but it can be quite distracting for the patient.

When looking at patient photographs, I find it helpful to discuss the face in thirds:  superior, middle, and lower. Remember to be tactful and sensitive when discussing any potential treatment needs — balancing any negative facial aspects with positive ones. The patient always knows what they want but usually have no idea what they need.  They’re aware of popular products from the media but do not know how these products work.  Much of the consultation is spent educating the patient about facial injectables and what they can achieve.

During this phase it’s valuable to educate your patient as to cause and effect of facial defects.  For example, a patient may be focused on their nasolabial folds that are actually the downstream effect of volume loss in their malar area. Now is the time to hand the patient a mirror.  Have them watch what happens to their NLF when you gently elevate their malar tissue.  This will help the patient understand how malar volume loss contributes to the NLF.

Beauty is defined by balance and symmetry and as we age we tend to become more asymmetric.  Everyone’s face has a fuller, and therefore, a more deflated half.  It’s critical to point this out to the patient before any treatment is agreed upon.

Step 5: Treat or Refer Decision

Be an active listener and observe a patient’s body language as they speak. This is critical when deciding whether or not to treat a patient.  Red flags include unrealistic or extreme expectations, proclamations of dissatisfaction with prior practitioners and results, and over-preoccupation with a certain facial feature. I repeat the following words at every course I teach:  “You’ll never regret the patient you didn’t treat.”

Step 6: What, Why and How

If you’ve decided this is a patient you can and want to treat and the patient is in agreement with your diagnosis of their chief complaint its time to deliver the what (neurotoxins, dermal fillers) why (static versus dynamic wrinkles, volume loss, etc.) and how (the product, treatment plan, and regimen).

Step 7: Q and A

This is your opportunity to address any lingering issues. The concept of esthetics is quite personal and subjective, so connecting with your patients is vital to avoiding problems down the road.

Many patients do some web education ahead of time.  They often know small bits and pieces of the anti-aging treatments available as well as industry buzz words.  Even if you don’t offer any of these ancillary treatments or cosmeceuticals in your office you’ll need to have at least a working knowledge of them. A deep anatomical understanding of the face, its aging process, and esthetics is also an indisputable advantage.

Be an active listener and observe a patient’s body language as they speak. This is critical when deciding whether or not to treat a patient.  Red flags include unrealistic or extreme expectations, proclamations of dissatisfaction with prior practitioners and results, and over-preoccupation with a certain facial feature. I repeat the following words at every course I teach:  “You’ll never regret the patient you didn’t treat.”

Step 6: What, Why and How

If you’ve decided this is a patient you can and want to treat and the patient is in agreement with your diagnosis of their chief complaint its time to deliver the what (neurotoxins, dermal fillers) why (static versus dynamic wrinkles, volume loss, etc.) and how (the product, treatment plan, and regimen).

Step 7: Q and A

This is your opportunity to address any lingering issues. The concept of esthetics is quite personal and subjective, so connecting with your patients is vital to avoiding problems down the road.

Many patients do some web education ahead of time.  They often know small bits and pieces of the anti-aging treatments available as well as industry buzz words.  Even if you don’t offer any of these ancillary treatments or cosmeceuticals in your office you’ll need to have at least a working knowledge of them. A deep anatomical understanding of the face, its aging process, and esthetics is also an indisputable advantage.

In Summary

The facial injectable market is crowded with estheticians, nurses, dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and even gynecologists all vying for the same patient population.  The initial consult is often where the patient’s decision whether or not to choose you as their facial injector is made.

Provide the experience that the patient deserves and collect the information you need.The consultation is an opportunity and you should use it.

Dr. Meinecke is immediate past president of the Maryland Academy of General Dentistry and currently serves on the Maryland State Dental Associations Legislative and Government Affairs Council.  Nationally, she is a spokesperson for the AGD and serves on their Legislative and Governmental Affairs Council.  Dr. Meinecke maintains a full time practice in Potomac, Maryland.

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Summer 2016 News: Dental Practices: Labor and Employment Law

One way to a successful dental practice is managing employment risks. Practice owners must make sure they are in strict compliance with all state and federal laws.

Below are some ways for dental practices to avoid significant liability:

  • Using corporations to provide limited liability for acts of employees
  • Employing a competent manager, and providing them with the necessary employment law information
  • Periodically submitting office procedures for review by certified public accountants
  • Encouraging periodic updating of employee manuals and good interaction between your office manager and employment law specialists
  • Encouraging your office manager to resolve problems before they occur

Because of the plethora of rules and regulations governing employment law, it is important for dental practice owners to keep a current employee manual and to submit the manual and all personnel forms to an attorney for periodic review. Below are some of the areas and issues that should be addressed.

Hiring.      Dentists and their office managers should be aware of the numerous employment law issues related to hiring.

Employee Performance Evaluations.       Dentists and their office managers should implement a fair and honest employee evaluation system to motivate exceptional employees and document employee performance problems and employee misconduct.

Discipline and Discharge.       Discharge and discipline decisions should be based solely on sound and fair reasons. Dentists and their office managers should maintain complete documentation, consistently follow established policies and procedures, and support termination decisions with adequate grounds.

Wages, Hours, and Compensation.     Federal and some state laws establish minimum wage levels for employees and require overtime pay at the rate of one and one half (1.5) times the regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 hours per week.

Terms, Conditions, and Privileges of Employment.      Employee manuals should include policies governing maternity, family and medical leave that provide for benefits, job restoration, and leave time.

Safety and Health.     Federal law requires that employers identify and eliminate health and safety hazards in the workplace. Dental Practice owners should provide a work environment free from hazards that cause death or serious physical harm.

Unemployment Compensation.       Dentists and their office managers should be aware of their obligations with respect to unemployment compensation. All states provide for the payment of unemployment compensation benefits to individuals who become unemployed through no fault of their own.

Workers’ Compensation.      Failure to provide workers’ compensation insurance can expose an employer to liability for work-related incidents.

Employee Benefits.      Failure to properly document and administer employee benefit plans pursuant to all applicable federal laws can result in tax consequences and expose dental practice owners to monetary fines, penalties, and damages.

Equal Employment Opportunities.      Federal equal employment opportunity laws prohibit discrimination and harassment in employment based on sex, race, color, national origin, religion, age, and disability. These laws apply to every aspect of the employment relationship.

Record Retention and Posting of Notices.      Federal laws require that dental practice owners retain various employment records for specified periods of time. Failure to comply with these requirements can have significant consequences.

Dentists and their office managers should consult with an attorney specializing in labor and employment law to ensure compliance with all applicable local, state and federal laws and regulations.

Stuart Oberman EsqStuart J. Oberman, Esq handles a wide range of legal issues for the dental profession including cyber security breaches, employment law, practice sales, OSHA, and HIPAA compliance, real estate transactions, lease agreements, noncompete agreements, dental board complaints, and professional corporations.

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Summer 2016 News: GAGD Regional Meeting Raves

botox for dentistry

Dr. Mark Sayeg, Dr. Gigi Meinecke, and Dr. Thomas Price

botox for dentists

Dr. Meinecke demonstrates during cadaver dissection.

botox-2

Attendees getting some hands-on experience.

Last April, 12 GAGD members walked in to Dr. GiGi Meinecke’s FACES Botox workshop and three days later walked out certified in cosmetic facial injectables (Botox®, Xeomin®, Restylane®, and Juvederm®).

Dr. Meinecke began the course by reviewing the facial structures most commonly requested for these cosmetic treatments via cadaver dissection.

Over the next three days, attendees got detailed instruction in facial injectables, including: relevant pharmacology, how the face ages, patient selection, proper asepsis, and more. Each afternoon, attendees participated in hands-on live patient injections.

 

Attendee Comments:

  • “I was very impressed with the quality of material offered in this course”
  • “Great course. Well-organized and well-presented.”
  • “In twenty-five years of practice, this is in the top two or three courses I have taken.”
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Summer 2016 News: Save the Date for GAGD’s 2017 Annual Meeting

January 27 and 28 – Marriott Century Center Atlanta Georgia Dental Meeting

Featured Speakers at the 2017 Annual Meeting include:

“Innovative” Periodontics creates success in today’s dental practice
Sam Low, DDS, MS, M.Ed

  • Standardizing the collection of periodontal data in a time efficient manner to determine accurately the prognosis of restorative abutments considering when to extract and place implants
  • Developing “realistic” non-surgical therapies and the respective re-evaluation with emphasis on “new” anti-inflammatory systems including micro-ultrasonics and laser technology.
  • Establishing a quality periodontal maintenance program that enhances the restorative practice including third party reimbursement.

Factors Critical to Managing Office Emergencies
Butch Ferguson, DMD

  • Discuss the importance of being prepared to manage an emergency which could happen at any time, any place and to anyone
  • Discuss common misconceptions in managing medical emergencies
    Discuss the need to have an office emergency “action plan” which details basic resuscitative measures for the patient
  • Identify the basic emergency equipment which should be present in the office

Restorative Endodontics, a modern standard of care for long-term success
Real World Endo presents: Alex Fleury, DDS, MS

  • Appreciate the scientific concepts for success by incorporating a few new simple steps during clinical care.
  • Understand the importance of proper straight-line access and the factors necessary to accomplishing the task.
  • Recognize the many applications for fiber-optic ultrasonics in endodontics.
  • Recognize the correct way to use an ultrasonic in the pursuit of hidden canals.
  • Become familiar with a novel and very efficient (drill-less) post preparation technique.

The Role of Dentistry in Sleep Medicine
Mayoor Patel, DDS, MS

  • Identify intraoral findings suggestive of a possible sleep breathing disorder
  • How to interact with our medical colleagues in managing patients with obstructive sleep apnea
  • Understanding oral appliance therapy

Optimizing Your Practice Potential
Elise Nussbaumer, Team One Dental

  • The perfect course for staff members!
  • Discover and capture the hidden potential in your practice
  • Maximize your marketing investment through Best Practice retention strategies
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Explorer Summer 2015 Issue: Save the Date for January 2016 Symposium!

Our 2015 Annual Meeting this past January was a huge success—thanks to everyone who was there!

We know that everyone is still recovering from the excitement of the 2015 Annual Meeting, but we’re already getting pumped for 2016. GAGD is pleased to announce next year’s feature guest lecturer—one of the biggest names in dentistry—Dan E. Fischer, DDS, FAGD, founder and president of Ultradent Products, Inc.
As a young dentist, Dr. Fischer’s passion for hemostasis inspired him to work after-hours in his basement inventing products that have proven to be seminal for the entire industry: today, Astringedent, ViscoStat, and Ultrapak are staples of operative dentistry. Ultradent now manufactures and packages more than 500 materials, devices, and instruments that are used worldwide by dentists, group practices, dental and veterinary labs, government agencies, and universities.

Dan E. Fischer, DDS, FAGD

Dan E. Fischer, DDS, FAGD

Attendees of GAGD’s 2016 Annual Meeting will have the opportunity and privilege to experience a full-day lecture by Dr. Fischer himself. Close To Home: What Expert Marriage Advice Can Teach Us About Creating Successful, Long-Lasting Dentistry describes a fun way for dental professionals to stay on top of the complex and ever-changing dental world by comparing the creation of quality, long-lasting dentistry with the creation of a quality, long-lasting marriage.

In this program, Dr. Fischer covers several issues vital to modern operative dentistry: dos and don’ts for a plethora of restorative materials, best techniques for restoration of severely compromised posterior teeth, how to achieve profound hemostasis and maintain control throughout your procedures, advancements in bonding and adhesive technologies, and an in-depth look of in-office and take-home tooth whitening, including the treatment of fluorosis.

GAGD is very excited to offer this invaluable learning opportunity from Dr. Fischer to its members. The 2016 Annual Meeting is January 29-30 at the Marriott Century Center in Atlanta. Save the dates and register ASAP—you don’t want to miss out on this one!

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MasterTrack 5 Update

Our May 2015 Mastertrack IV was jam-packed with great information from Prosthodontist Bruce Small, DDS.   Dr. Small presented a survey of techniques, as well as ‘wins’ and ‘fails’ in fixed prosthetics.  As always, the group enjoyed Dr. Small’s vast experience and passion for craftmanship in dentistry.

dr. bruce small with Dr wendy macke dr joey pitts dr. bruce small with Dr ken Gilbert

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MEMBER SPOTLIGHT

Spotlight on Peter A. Pate, DDS, MAGD

Peter Pate, Atlanta dentistMasterTrack was a unique experience because of the impressive and comprehensive educational opportunities as well as the meaningful relationships developed within the class. Before embarking on this five-year adventure, my only bond with the other participants was a dental degree.  After working to achieve aggressive goals, and spending three days together every quarter for five years, I became almost as close with some of the other MasterTrack members as I had with dental school classmates. We learned new techniques and concepts and we opened our minds to other viewpoints as we discussed them in the relaxed and open environment of our classroom. We watched and helped each other advance as clinicians.

Peter Pate, DDS, MAGDBecoming a Master in the AGD and completing the Georgia MasterTrack (MT) program have benefited my practice and me immensely.  The Georgia MT provided an uncommon opportunity to grow as a clinician and to network with colleagues who have an ongoing commitment to providing quality care through continuing education.  Meeting once a quarter over a three-day weekend for five years was a big commitment, but I was rarely disappointed! Renowned clinicians from across the country provided the latest information. They observed and encouraged us as we improved our clinical skills in their respective subjects. We enjoyed a wide assortment of lectures and had numerous opportunities to engage in “hands-on” activities across a variety of dental disciplines.  Extracting teeth from the jaws of pigs was one of our more entertaining undertakings. One of the biggest challenges for me was taking large-scale assignments back to my practice and actually performing the requirement on patients utilizing the techniques presented by the visiting experts. The final piece of the puzzle was documenting the process in a detailed PowerPoint and then delivering the presentation to our classmates and to the visiting clinicians. The dental wizards offered constructive, and sometimes brutal, feedback on our procedures as well as our presentation skills. Repeating this pattern over a five-year period definitely boosted my confidence in my documentation and presentation skills.

This process was beneficial to me in several ways.  Throughout my career, there have been various aspects of general dentistry I have shifted away from and not performed as frequently. This is partly because I tended to focus on what I enjoyed and it became easy to refer procedures I don’t enjoy as much. The MT education brought me up to date in all fields of dentistry. This is particularly true with the parts that I do not enjoy as much.  I gained a clearer understanding of all current industry techniques, which has made me a more comprehensive dentist.  Although I still may choose to refer certain procedures, I am better positioned to speak to a patient or to a specialist about different treatment scenarios. Thanks to MasterTrack, my technology competence has also improved significantly.  For example, I will routinely use photographs now to record patient information and to communicate with labs and specialists. The skills required to create presentations for classmates is easily transferred to patient case presentations or to discussions with team members. All of these skills were gained in a non-threatening, close-knit, study-group style environment.

My current crazy passion outside of dentistry, other than my family of course, is the sport of triathlon. A triathlon is an athletic event comprising three activities: swim, bike and run. As I began to pursue this sport, I was fairly confident in my bike and run abilities. However, I was literally unable to swim! After numerous lessons, looking and feeling like a child wearing fins and floaties, I finally got the hang of it. As I trained and improved in each of the three activities, I challenged myself to enter and complete one of the most grueling endurance events imaginable: an Ironman. This includes a 2.4 mile open-water swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a 26.2 mile run. After my first Ironman (Lake Placid 2011), I proclaimed that I would never do that again. However, the triathlon bug is contagious. I have completed two more Ironman distance events and numerous half-Ironman events. My wife and 16-year-old son are “over it” but I am not finished yet. Despite the demanding training requirements, the camaraderie with fellow athletes is rewarding, the competition is intense, and I have never been in better shape.

Dr. Pate, Atlanta dentistIn fact, participating in triathlons is similar to the MasterTrack program. You are in it for the long haul in an effort to make substantial career and life improvements. I strongly encourage other dentists to improve their skills and form lifetime friendships in the next Georgia MasterTrack program.

 

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